Tag Archives: event organizer

7 Bad Habits of Event Planners

Are you guilty of any of these seven common bad habits of event planners?

Don’t worry you aren’t the only one.

Over time event planners develop habits that might not lead to the most productive and successful work but recognizing the habits that need improvement is essential to future success.

event planner meeting

Below, we take a look at the 7 most common bad habits:

1) Not Being A Good Listener
It has been said that the devil is in the details. When you don’t take the time to listen to your staff, volunteers, attendees or other vendors you may be missing out on important information. Falling into this bad habit might cause you to end up missing a specific requirement or detail that is critical to the success of your event.

2) Turning Into A Stress Monster When Things Get Tough
There is a big difference between being internally stressed but handling it like a true event professional and being stressed to the point where your co-workers, staff and attendees notice your behavior. This stressed out attitude will trickle down to your staff and before you know it everyone, causing a negative vibe to overtake your event. The key in these situations is to keep yourself cool and composed on the outside, even when you have a million thoughts, ideas and tasks running through your mind.

3) Not Asking For Help
This is a very common mistake committed by new planners wanting to seem eager to grow their career or business, however it needs to be done in the right ways. Taking things one step at a time and making conscious decisions about the amount of work committed to with help to keep from being overwhelmed and burnt out.

4) Moving Too Quickly
As event planners, we all spend time running around keeping our guests happy and the logistics flowing smooth but moving too quickly can be a recipe for disaster. Being clumsy or scattered reflects poorly upon you and your company, and could lead to you injuring yourself or others. Be sure to stop, take a breath, and embrace your event.

5) Working 24/7
Many event planners have the luxury of setting their own hours and sometimes working from home when planning before and after events. This is a fantastic benefit, but it can also be potentially dangerous, leading towards the bad habit of working during all hours of the day and evening. Do your best to set working hours where you commit to getting your work accomplished. Outside of these hours stay focused on your life away from your professional duties.

6) Acting Like An Attendee
No matter the setting, you must always stay professional and keep in mind that you are not one of the attendees, you are the one in charge making the event come together. Mingling with guests is of course okay when appropriate, but never take the interaction or participation to a level where you might make the guest or yourself uncomfortable.

7) Focusing On The Competition More Than Yourself (And Your Event)
You never know the full story behind another person’s business, so you can’t spend too much time obsessing over their every move. Focusing on your business, your events and the experience you provide as a planner should always be your main focus.

Olympics Highlight Event Insurance Importance

StethoscopeOver 100 prominent doctors and professors sent an open letter to the World Health Organization (WHO) on Friday, May 27th, urging for the postponement or cancellation of the 2016 Summer Olympics due to the widespread occurrence of the Zika virus.

Officials stated that the Zika virus has “more serious medical consequences than previously known” and has worsened in the Rio area despite widespread mosquito treatment programs.
“It is unethical to run the risk,” the letter said. “It is therefore imperative that WHO conduct a fresh, evidence-based assessment of Zika and the Games, and its recommendations for travelers.”

Brazil is one of almost 60 countries that have reported continuing transmission of Zika by mosquitoes and with over 500,000 people set to travel from around the world for the Olympic games, there is a considerable threat.

Despite these warnings, it seems organizers of the 2016 Olympic Games are moving forward. The 2016 Olympics are in less than two months, running from August 5 to August 21 and although it seems the games will go on, the recent push for cancellation or postponement highlights the importance of event insurance.

Without sufficient liability protection, the cancellation or postponement of large events such as the Summer Olympics could lead an event organizer, company or individual into bankruptcy! The last Summer Olympics in 2012 cost over 14 BILLION dollars! If the event did not go as planned, the economic outcome would be devastating.

Event insurance is essential whether you’re organizing the Olympics, or organizing public events large and small. Want to learn more about Event Insurance? Find out about your options here.

4 Stylish Options For Event Organizers To Keep Their Valuables Safe

There are many lessons to be learned in the event planning industry but an
important lesson in particular is that there is no “safe” place for your bag. Event days can get busy, and unfortunately, locking down your bag is not always the top priority when there is an event to run.

So where do you stash your stuff on event days? How about on your body! Here are a few stylish ways to keep your must-haves within your reach and out of harm’s way:

Hip Sister Waist Purse ($29 – $45 each)

vegas-sister
via Hipssister

Essentially a stretchy, wide-fabric band that fits snugly around the hips. It comes complete with zippered, almost invisible pockets, large enough to fit an Iphone, a few credit cards and a bit of cash. Hip Sister Waist Purses ($29 – $45 each) come in many solid colors, prints and varying widths – there’s even one that can be worn as a mini skirt around the pool – so they’re bound to work with just about any event uniform you find yourself working in.

Jared Leto Hip Pack ($28)

Hip-Bag
via Jaredletomerch.com

Jared Leto is not afraid to raise some eyebrows as he’s recently by showing up everywhere wearing what most people would call, a fanny pack. There is a difference however as he’s wise enough to call his bag a Hip Pack and sell it on jaredleto.com. While Leto’s bag may not win you a ton of style points, it is a functional bag for planners everywhere.

Speakeasy Supply Co. ($52) and Sholdit Infinity Pocket Scarves ($50)

SpeakeasySupplyCo SholdIt
Designed for international nomad types wishing to discreetly secure their passport, phones (and perhaps a flask), the Speakeasy Supply Infinity Pocket Scarf and the scarves by Sholdit are, as you might imagine, stylish infinity scarves with hidden pockets. Simply tuck your goodies into the scarf, zip closed, wrap around your neck and voila! You’re ready to go about your business, hands-free!

Gucci Waist Bag ($590)

Gucci Belt Bag
The dual-pocket Gucci waist bag has been around for years and is popular with many event planners in the fashion world. Though the Gucci classic is pricey, when you think about the number of days you’ll wear it, this built-for-the-long-haul number becomes something of a bargain.

How Event Volunteer Programs Can Help Event Organizers

From community festivals to large conferences, many special events rely on
volunteer support, making volunteer management an essential skill for event organizers.

So what goes into designing, recruiting, and managing event volunteers? Check out our tips and tricks below.
event volunteers holding hands

Design Your Event Volunteer Program

Choose Job Duties Wisely
Fact: Not all jobs can be done by volunteers. Volunteers should be trusted with positions such as greeters, room monitors, and information desk personnel, rather than positions that involve long-term event involvement.

Volunteers Love Perks
While volunteer positions are typically established to fill an event need, it’s important to understand what type of incentive the volunteers may desire. Are they looking for special access? A great giveaway? Free passes to the event? Asking volunteers why they are
interested in your event can help you provide the right incentives for your event volunteer program.

Make Sure You Know The Laws
As an event organizer, you must be very careful and make sure that your event volunteer program conforms to all the labor laws. Always refer to the US Department of Labor
website if you have any questions as to what your volunteers should, and should not be doing.

Volunteers Are Not A Crutch For Your Budget
The importance of volunteers cannot be understated but it is important to make sure your event has the budget to support essential, skilled full-time staff. Don’t let volunteers
become a swap for full-time staff to maintain the budget of an event.

Recruit Event Volunteers

Set Your Volunteer Selection Criteria
When recruiting event volunteers, it is important to state your selection criteria up-front and include practical requirements such as language and equipment skills. Selection rules will be especially important for positions that are likely to be very popular.

Volunteer Perks
Let’s face it, most volunteers are participating at your event because they would like
something in return: merchandise, special access, internship credit, etc. State what your incentives are from the get-go so no event volunteer is surprised or disappointed.

Make Connections With The Community
If your event needs a continuous amount of volunteers, consider partnering with groups in the community. Look for groups whose mission is in line with your event goals.

Match Each Volunteers Skills Accordingly
It is crucial that the volunteer job skills match the volunteer job. Be prepared for
individuals who may want to participate at your event that have special needs, or physical limitations. Just as with an employment position, it is important to be inclusive, rather than exclusive, and avoid discrimination.

Managing Event Volunteers

Volunteer Position Descriptions
Just because an event volunteer is not being paid for their services doesn’t mean they do not need a description of their duties. Be sure to clearly inform event volunteers of their role, who they report to, and what hours they are expected to work.

Event Volunteer Code of Conduct
In addition to a description of duties, you as the event organizer should also include a code of conduct and bill of rights. A typical volunteer code of conduct includes, the expectation to arrive on time, demonstration of a positive attitude, respect to co-workers, reporting risks and injuries, and of course, to have fun. You should also make it clear to volunteers that they have obligations as well, including a fair, safe, healthy work environment free from harassment.

Plan For The Best But Expect The Worst
“Every one of my event volunteers showed up and did exactly what was expected of them.” – said no event organizer ever.
There is always a chance of volunteers not showing up, or following through on their
responsibilities. To help reduce the risk of this happening, make it clear what the
repercussions are for volunteers who no-show. This could include withholding any
incentive intended to be given or in some cases, charging a volunteer for benefits that may have already been received. In addition to a plan for no-shows, there should be a plan of action to deal with difficult volunteers who may need to be assisted or removed from the program.

Training for the big event
An orientation for volunteers prior to your event is a critical step to helping make sure that all runs smoothly during your event. The orientation should provide background on the event, and demonstrate any tasks an event volunteer may be doing. The orientation is a great opportunity to review and provide any special equipment that might be needed such as t-shirts, badges or safety equipment.

After The Event: Give A Million Thanks!
Happy event volunteers return and more than likely volunteer again for others. So remember, you can never say thank you and recognize volunteers enough! In addition to saying thanks, provide evaluations and seek feedback from volunteers to find out how you can improve next year.

Volunteers can be a great resource for event organizers and an invaluable part of helping to make an event run smoothly, with the proper training.

Have you had positive experience using volunteers? Tweet us @InsuringEvents